Grand View Normal Institute
Grandview Heritage Foundation
GNI Girl Students 1913
In 1888, one year prior to the opening of Jewett
Memorial Hall, GNI graduated its first class.  Of
the three graduates that year, Edith Townsend,
appropriately from Grandview, received the first
diploma.  For the next three decades over two
hundred students would follow Edith's path.  The
total enrollment at the school during its 41-year
history was over 2000 pupils.
GNI BASEBALL TEAM 1908
Even though some students were present at school
for only a brief period of time, the lives of all
students changed.  At a time when Tennessee's
rural schools were of the poorest quality and the
school year was no longer than three months, GNI
was offering classes for nine months taught by
teachers from Dartmouth, Harvard, Vassar,
Welsley and Yale.  Studies listed in the school's
1889-1890 catalogue include, "Latin, Greek,
Music, Art, Morals and Manners, Geometry,
Bookkeeping, Natural Philosophy, Tennessee
Geology, Botany, School Economy and Primary
Methods, Zoology, U.S. Constitution and
Government, English History, Ancient and
Medieval History, Trigonometry, Surveying,
Instrumental Drawing, English Readings and
Composition."
GIRLS DRAMA CLASS
GNI was the first school between Cincinnati, Ohio
and Atlanta, Georgia to offer twelve complete
grades of education.  As people in the region learned
about the new school, a flood of students enrolled
from Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, Georgia
and Alabama.  Grown men and women lacking in
any formal education became students.  Entire
families relocated to Grandview so their children
would be close to the school.  Soon, nine large
framed structures took the place of a single log
building.  In addition, Tennessee's first chapter of
the Christian Endeavor Society was organized at
GNI, and GNI became the first Tennessee school
accredited by the University of Tennessee (GNI
graduates gained automatic admission to the
university).  The school's greatest accomplishment,
however, were the many doctors, lawyers,
ministers, teachers, writers, artists, scientists and
bankers that began their schooling at the plateau's
edge.  As revealed by letters written later in life,
each student remained forever grateful to a place
that made them the very best that they could be.
GNI FACULTY 1904
GNI Campus East
GNI EAST CAMPUS
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
Despite its remarkable contribution to the region,
GNI was still a private school relying on
tuition-paying students.  At the turn of the century,
free, public education was becoming more prevelant,
and by 1919 counties in the region operated their
own high schools.  That same year the AMA
discontinued its direct involvement with GNI, but
money from local residents was matched with some
continuing AMA funding to keep the school open.  
Then, in 1925, the AMA discontinued all support and
the Grandview community was unsuccessful in its
search for another religious organization to operate
the school.  The Grandview Normal Institute was no
more, and only one of its buildings was absorbed
into the new Rhea County public school system.
GNI WEST CAMPUS
COMMENCEMENT STAGE 1910
GNI GRADUATING CLASS 1913
GNI Campus West
GNI Faculty 1904
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
GNI STUDENTS 1913
GNI BASEBALL TEAM 1908
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation
(c) Grandview Heritage Foundation